GENERAL ASSEMBLY

Disarmament and International Security Committee (GA1/DISEC)

 

Director Valentina Acosta
Valentina Acosta is a senior at FIU majoring in International Relations with a concentration in the Middle East and the Muslim World. This will be her third and last FIMUN, and she could not be more excited to be directing DISEC. Valentina was born in Barranquilla, Colombia but has lived in Miami for most of her life. These days you can find her working on her Arabic or prepping for her graduate school entry exam. On a really good day, you can find her relaxing with her earphones in listening to her Bad Bunny playlist. This academic year (2018-2019) Valentina served as a head delegate and got the privilege to travel to nine conferences and visit both Canada and the West Coast for the first time.

 
 

As the First Committee, the Disarmament and International Security Committee (DISEC) is the largest of the six main United Nations General Assemblies. Some might even go as far as to call it the most dynamic of the GAs, due to the highly contentious issues brought to the table and the sheer number of countries present. At FIMUN 32, delegates will take on one of two major security issues plaguing the world.

The Syrian Civil War, now entering its eight consecutive year, has received massive international attention due to the increasing involvement of international players; most notably, the United States, Iran, and Russia. Whether it be the sponsorship of rebel groups, aerial support, combat training, or weapons distribution, the amount of foreign participation in Syria has effectively turned a civil war into an international crisis. The instability within the country is one that transcends borders. As actors both in the region and abroad plunge themselves deeper into the conflict, the results of this brutal war have serious international implications and states must be held accountable for their part in the chaos.

The state sponsored persecution of minorities is a loaded issue. We are seeing how nearly every day a new series of heinous crimes is being perpetrated against certain populations, both ethnic and religious, with little to no protections under their national governments. In today’s world, riddled with increased involuntary regional and international migration, civil instability and prejudice, it is no longer enough to wonder what is happening to minorities inside their respective countries. The complicity of governments in enacting violence against their own people is something this body was created to prevent. No country, regardless of its development levels, is immune to the effects of this issue.

That being said, delegates will need to approach this topic with the sensibility that it deserves, making sure to be as respectful as possible when discussing the sociocultural landscapes of all states. Just because it is foreign to you does not make it okay to make uneducated assumptions. Above all else, we are diplomats.